31

For the purpose of this question, let's define a dead programming language as one for which you cannot buy a newly manufactured piece of hardware and install an operating system which will let you run a compiler or interpreter for your language, without requiring an emulator. Thus, assembly language for any architecture which isn't currently being manufactured is dead.

This is a fairly strict definition of dead, since many dead languages under this definition are still easily runnable through emulators or hardware bought from eBay. Bonus votes if hardware or emulators are completely unobtainable.

108

QBasic!

46

Turbo Pascal.

40

Java. Oh wait, that's just dead to me.
(That was a JOKE people).

In all seriousness:
Modula-3 (don't remember the compiler vendor's name anymore, but compiled for DOS)
Powerbuilder...at least I HOPE that one is dead

24

I still know Commodore BASIC and Commodore 64 assembly language.

Probably not unattainable, but getting very close.

21

I think the Apollo guidance computers (programmed in assembler) are pretty much dead.

I had a chunk of read-only-memory containing some programming for that, that I finally threw away a few years ago. It was what they called "braid" and it consisted of a long thin matrix of wires and magnetic cores woven together. If a wire went inside or outside a core encoded a binary bit. It was all folded up into a little box.

Those machines, by the way, were made entirely out of NOR gates, for reliability.

19

Latin# and Sanskript. They're ancient programing languages written by the Romans and the Indians (respectively).

19

Old languages don't die. they just become much more expensive to maintain.

18

HyperTalk

I was in Middle School, what can I say?

15

Not sure how dead or if it's a programming language ... but Logo.

14

Clipper. Summer 1987 was a grand replacement for dBase III+. Clipper 5.01 was even better. A variant still exists in Xbase++

13

GWBasic. D-:

alt text

10

Intercal

9

6502 Assembler. Brings back many memories (not only good ones ;-) ).

I still remember the hex code for the NOP operand...

9

None of the programming languages you might think are dead are actually dead. ALGOL? Still in use by state governments that have Unisys mainframes. APL? Still out there. COBOL, FORTRAN, Mumps, etc are all still installable on newly purchased hardware with modern operating systems without emulators.

Perhaps NewtonScript is what you're asking about. I don't know.

8

I don't know if it meets your definition (And I don't care to take time to research) but back in the day I used to know APL. Haven't even seen a reference to it for at least 25 years.

8
  • Simons' BASIC
  • ABC 80 BASIC
  • AMOS
  • Amiga E
  • Super Agnus (Copper/Blitter) but I'm not sure it's even Turing complete...
7

Love to respond, but I'd have to Google to see if the 6502 is still being manufactured.

7

Sinclair BASIC

7

I learnt to program in school using BBC BASIC on the beloved BBC Micro.

6

Snobol anyone? How about if the language was never alive -- in that case Wren? No disrepect to Ken Slonneger. I actually enjoyed his course.

6

ACTION! Terrible name, cool little language and developer enivronment. The language was tailored to the 6502 in numerous ways. You could do things with it on the Atari 8-bits that you could only do in assembly otherwise. (Action! was only available on the Atari 8-bits, I should add.)

Like early Borland systems, Action! offered a built-in editor (which was the nicest editor you could find on the Atari, in my experience), an in-memory one-pass compiler, and a monitor to execute and debug your code. Compilation was speedy and the code it produced was tight and fast. The development system was distributed on a cartridge (ugh) and you had to either have the cartridge plugged-in to run your program or distribute your program with a run-time library (which was not free -- not a great way to do these things).

I learned Action! before I learned C. A great deal of C came easily to me because of Action!, including pointers, which usually trip newbies up. The language itself wasn't revolutionary -- Just Another Procedural Language -- and not a whole lot of abstractions to soak up, like modularization or object-oriented anything. But it was more powerful than BASIC or Pascal, gave you immediate access to the underlying hardware, and abstracted out the more tedious parts of assembly coding. Without a decent C compiler on the Atari, it was the only game in town.

6

Logo on the Thomson MO-5:

And Locomotive BASIC on the Amstrad CPC 464:

Amstrad CPC 464

PS: Yes, it's a cassette tape deck on the right and it was making an unforgettable noise :)

5

If I can just find a card reader I still have a punch card deck FORTRAN IV application to convert Roman numbers in Decimal and back.

5

REXX, Turbo Pascal

4

Extended Basic of TI99/4A

dbase

4

A flavor of basic that ran on MSX machines! It was my first language ever, I was like 8 years old, I don't even remember anything from it, except for gosub! (lol) and that line numbers have semantic value. Here's an emulator for MSX (blue MSX).

4

Altos BASIC.

alt text

3

PDP-11 Assembler.

Although I guess there is an emulator around.

3

Z80 assembly is fairly dead.

3
  • 6502
  • 68K
  • Apple II Integer BASIC
  • Applesoft BASIC
  • Manchester Mark I Assembly
  • Concurrent Euclid

I'd list 6800 and 6809 but they're being used for USB devices.

3

Benton Harbor Basic, for the Heathkit H-8 (and H89) computer.

It was named after Benton Harbor, Michigan, home of the Heath company, manufacturer of Heathkit products.

alt text

3

JOVIAL - Jules Own Version of the International Algorithmic Language.

3

COMAL 80, which was a nice improvement over the builtin Commodore BASIC - I sold the cartridge along with the C= 64, and ARexx, which had the force of being the ubiquitous glue between programmes on the Amiga - I sold the Amiga 4000.

3

Apple Basic... good times on the Apple II GS and learning my first programming language. It was also a good way to learn that drawing to the screen problematically can be difficult but yet rewarding.

3

Is Modula-2 still around? I have also used SQLWindows, if anyone else has ever used that!

3

I learned a bizarre version of assembly that was used on the CDC Cyber, which had 60 bit words. That was...different. This text describing the memory archetecture is taken from Wikipedia:

The central processor (CPU) and central memory (CM) operated in units of 60-bit words. In CDC lingo, the term "byte" referred to 12-bit entities (which coincided with the word size used by the peripheral processors). Characters were six bits, operation codes were six bits, and central memory addresses were 18 bits. Central processor instructions were either 15 bits or 30 bits. The 18-bit addressing inherent to the Cyber 170 series imposed a limit of 262,144 (256K) words of main memory, which was semiconductor memory in this series. The central processor had no I/O instructions, relying upon the peripheral processor (PP) units to do I/O.

Whee!

I definitely think this qualifies under the definition stated in the question...if you can buy a CDC Cyber somewhere, I can't imagine who would be selling it. (Since it was the size of several rooms with considerably less power than a PC.)

2

OLIE - a 3rd party Windows scripting language to automate mainframe applications and it will only run on Win3.11,95,98 not even the compatibility mode in XP would allow it to work.

I even wrote a syntax highlighting script for it in 2005/6 for use in the EditPlus text editor for Windows

2

GEM ('Greatly Enhanced MUMPS') a MUMPS derivative for the PDP-11 written by one of the people who worked on the original MUMPS project. I never actually did any programming on it but I do know someone who did.

2

DIBOL and DCL from my Vax days. DCL was my gateway drug to script programming.

The DIBOL compiler used to have a command line switch that caused it to print at the end of the compiler output some ascii art of a sheep and a saying that was something like "DIBOL - the black sheep of the Digital language family" if memory servers. I wish I had a print-out of that.

2

Integer Basic and Applesoft basic on Apple 2 systems

2

Personally, I don't think basic or assember dialects should count. Tons of people are still using some variety of both. The OQ says it counts though.

The only proper programming laguage I've ever used that I think is totally dead is Draco. The only information that is even available about it online is this sentence in a few online dictionaries:

A blend of Pascal, C and ALGOL 68 developed by Chris Gray in 1987. It has been implemented for CP/M-80 and Amiga.

It was a nice little systems programming laguage that was sort of like Pascal made C-like. It used the convention where control structures started with the Pascal-like name and ended with it reversed, sort of like the Bourne Shell.

The only major application I know of that used it was the Amiga port of Empire (not the commerical game: Empire: Wargame of the Century. That was more like a proto Civilization that a true Empire port.) It was the only usable true compiler you could get for the Amiga for free. It was available for download, or on the Fred Fish disks.

I actually corresponded with Chris for a while. He lived up near Edmunton Alberta, IIRC. Really nice guy.

2

APL - Can't buy a keyboard anymore....

To give a glimpse:
Iverson's "Notation As a Tool for Thought":
http://elliscave.com/APL_J/tool.pdf

Falkoff, Iverson & SUssenguth's "A Formal Description of System/360"
http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/032/falkoff.pdf

2

AMPLE ... a weird and wonderful Forth-like language for programming music that came with the Music 5000, an FM synth box that attached to the BBC Micro. ( http://www.acornelectron.co.uk/eu/revs/acp_pres/r-m5000.html)

There's absolutely NOTHING about this on the web. Can't understand why no-one's resurected or emulated it. It filled an interesting niche ... more accessible and dynamically integrated with the studio than C-sound or writing your music in Lisp or Processing. But not just another "wire-together" graphical dataflow language like Max or Pd.

A real, text-based programming language in which you could write your own musical subroutines as well as control synths and sequence musical events.

2
  • AppleBasic
2

I know Oberon. Never saw it run in anything than a simulator. The course at college was since replaced by Java :)

2

Amiga Copper lists

The first (mainstream) GPU programming language.

1

GIGL - GIGL Interactive Graphics Language (threaded-interpreted language for graphics programming used in 2D CAD application, project abandoned before release)

SOIL - Simple Object Interaction Language (internal app dev language, company out of business)

FlexAbility - OOP Extension to DataFlex 4GL (subsumed and obsoleted by DataFlex 3.0)

caveat: these are all languages that I wrote that are no longer available. Someone, somewhere may still have a copy of them, but I don't, and you can't buy one.

1

Autocoder, xs3

1

I'm actually reading a book on Z80A Assembly (Amstrad CPC) at the moment. More for nostalgia reasons than anything else.

1

OBF (Omnia Banking Functions) from ICL.

Awful, AWFUL, REXX-based language. The whole of Lloyd's Bank Counter application was written in it (apart from a C++ DLL to interface with card-readers - which was my only respite).

I still wake up some nights screaming.

1

It depends on you definition of "know". I studied PDP-8 assembler but never wrote substantial code in it. I'd probably be productive in less than a day. Similarly for about 5 other assembly languages.

8080 assembler mnemonics translate trivially into legal 80x86 code, so that may not count.

Heathkit BASIC is probably too close to currently available dialects to count. Similarly for WATFIV Fortran.

Do custom processors count? I was the only person in the world who knew that language...

1

PL-6

It was kind of a combination applications/systems programming language for Honeywell's CP-6 operating system. I last used it in the mid-1980's.

1

NOMAD sort of a 2.5 GL database language for IBM mainframes. Had a dialect of some sort of SQLish Hierachical/Relational databae query language, a report designer, and a block mode form builder. It was my first job out of Uni in 1989 and could have been my last because the language was dead already. Luckily the company migrated to Oracle before they laid their whole two person programming team off. Although I wouldn't say Oracle Forms and Reports are looking too healthy nowadays either.

Also Z80, 6802, and PDP11 assembler.

I don't knoow the status of Modula II, Scheme, or Prolog but they sure haven't helped me lately.

1

Please define "emulator".

I dare you to give a definition that will not make any "modern" language's virtual machine sound like an emulator. I don't know of any hardware that can run CLI natively and that would make all .NET languages not only "dead" but "unborn".

1

I learned programming on my TI-57 then TI-59... Also coded a bit of HP-48C language on a calculator of a friend.

I coded in Basic in lot of 8bit computers, each having its own dialect: Commodore CBM 4016, Apple //e, Amstrad CPC 6128, Atari ST 520, to mention only computers I owned, I also coded on other machines in shops, school, etc.

Used assembly on 6800 and 6502 and a number of micro-controllers. Plus a bit of Z80 and 8080.

I wouldn't touch it with a pole (it was already almost dead at the time, 15 years ago), but I was close to learn LTR3 on a French military project. Hey, there is even an English reference to it: http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/LTR3

Also coded a bit of Bull's Mini6 assembly language at the Uni.

1

NDL - Network Development Language, on Burroughs B1750

TAL - Tandem Application Language, on Tandem NonStop machines

ALGOL 60 - ALGOrithmic Language, on Burroughs 5500

I also programmed in a very early version of BASIC, where variables were one character unless they were strings, in which case they had a suffixed dollar sign, but there is probably some abomination out there somewhere that can still execute that stuff.

1

Here's my few:

Commodore PET Assembler

Commodore 64 Basic

Watcom Basic

Watcom Pascal

1

Special mention for Compiler that suffered the longest long slow death should go to Microsoft C Version 1.52a.

Barcode scanners -

Any number of BASICs. Start with MarsBasic.

Intermec's IRL.

For extra credit...

ObjectVision (From Borland, I believe).

cEnglish - anyone remember that? Actually a positive experience, esp. compared to the above.

1

VOS from Parity Software. It was a C type language mainly to access Dialogic voice boards to build Telephony applications. Purchased by Dialogic, then Diaglogic purchased by Intel.

1

Commodore Basic/ASM

1

... let's define a dead programming language as one for which you cannot buy a newly manufactured piece of hardware and install an operating system which will let you run a compiler or interpreter for your language, without requiring an emulator.

By that definition, I guess lisp counts, unless you think a lisp machine is easily obtainable. Depending of course on whether you deem existing interpreters as being emulators or not.

Uh .. and while we're at it; I guess Java would count as well, since it requires a Virtual Machine to execute.

1

TECO macro language. Even got a program written in TECO published in "The VAX/RSTS Professional Magazine" in 1983. The program was basically grep (which I hadn't heard of yet).

The command and macro language are the same. Ever command is a single character. They had a visual editor entirely written in the command language. It's source looked like line noise, but I learned a lot about the language by deciphering it.

1

Cobol and Comal. Did anyone ever use Comal in production or was it purely a learning language?

1

Atari BASIC, Turbo Basic XL, some 6502 machine code 68000 Assembler, GFA Basic (awesome editor)

(although "knowing" them is a bit exaggerated after all those years)

1

BASIC and your old Fortran.

1

I wrote some pretty fancy stuff in TECO once upon a time.

1

I guess any language for the MZ1Z016 series from Sharp is dead. I developed on that cool machine for several years from 1990 on.

1

Back in Russia, my first languages were Algol 60 (books only - no real machine time) and Electronika B3-34 programmable calculator. Then I dabbled in PL-1, Snobol, Prolog, Ada - still no computer time. First real code that I managed to run somewhere was C (not dead, no, no!) and Algol 68 (quite dead, imho). There was Modula-2 and Turbo Pascal 5.5 in the college. So here I am the walking graveyard of languages.

Edit: Oh damn - forgot the DB languages! Paradox, dBase, FoxPro (is it dead yet?), Clarion(!). All of these used professionally, too.

1

I thought my mad NATURAL skills were now useless but Google proves me wrong.

1

Logo for the BBC Micro.

1

I did my first coding in GWBASIC 3, which was born the same year as me if the copyright notice is to be believed.

1

By definition, if someone knows a language, it's not dead. :-)

1

LambdaMOO, a language to build MOO. Basically a prototype-based OO language built on top of a OO database. very cool.

1

PLUS -- Programming Language for Univac Systems, a product of Sperry Univac for their 1100 Series Mainframes.

Snobol.

Struct$ -- a macro assembler language for Univac 1100 Series, written as ASM Procs by Dr. Patrick Haggerty.

C/PM commands, like PIP

1

Lockheed SUE ASM - A PDP-11 knockoff, only used in DatagraphiX Auto-COM equipment to my knowledge.

1

A little late for answers, but just yesterday I discovered my personal version of MineSweeper on my TI-85 graphing calculator. I'm pretty sure that language is dead by now. :)

1

Forth

1

PLCS - a version of PL/1 which ran on the ucsd p-system. Used it in 1981 at Rutgers for the comp Sci 101 course

0

Z80 and 68000 assembly, and QL Basic of course ;)

I would also consider dBase and Clipper quite dead (as in 'technologically outdated')

0

I started out writing in Autocoder, Fargo and SPS for the 2nd generation IBM 1400-series mainframes. I think these qualify as dead languages, although we had a 1401 emulator card deck for early IBM 360s.

0

SPL for the HP/3000 computer.

0

Rexx, 386 protected mode assembler, Turbo Pascal, RMX

0

CP/M Baby!!

0

I still have a box of blank punchcards from my early programming days.

Until we moved in 2006, I had all the punchcards from my FORTRAN IV programming assignments (done back in 1979).

I also programmed assembler for a device known as the SCMP (scamp). Gave that away when we moved as well. I think it was one of the last ones around.

Modified assembler once for an IBM 3033.

I'd say 68HC11 assembler, but that microcontroller is actually still very popular as a teaching tool and as an embedded device. I still have one plus all the "bells and whistles" to connect it to a PC and program it (in assembler or C).

Cheers,

-Richard

0

I heartily wish Fortran were dead.

I worked with a big Roman guy once who informed me in a booming Italian accent:

Mike, Fortran is like Rock and Roll. IT WILL NEVER DIE.

0

Lotus 1-2-3 @macro(),@language() - death by @ signs. Although I think I've seen an emulator for 1-2-3.

0

65C02 assembly language for 128 KB memory.

0

How about GPSS? Never used it professionally but I was pretty good with in a class I took.

0

FORTRAN IV and probably even IBM FORTRAN G and H are dead, not because FORTRAN is dead (still alive and kicking) but because FORTRAN has moved on and those compilers are no longer available.

I think the questioner is on to an interesting idea, but it isn't quite the right question. First, the definition of dead is too strict. Second it's not enough that a language should be dead; it should be dead and interesting, or dead for an interesting reason.

Rexx was a nice language but I hear you can download free versions today that run on any unix box. And I think it's still central in the IBM mainframe world.

0

Various assembly languages (pdp-11, z80, 6502/AppleII)

Various Pascals

Modula II - wrote a optics focus control module for a micro-fiche reader/digitizer that never got out of the lab

Various Cobol's and old Fortran variants

0

SDL-88 (Specification and Description Language)

It was used in a CASE tool called VERILOG Object GEODE

0

Apple's - Sweet16

6502, 6809, 68000,

UCSD Pascal, Applesoft Basic, Dec Basic Plus, Forth

0

Imlac PDS-1, PDS-4 assembly language.

0

Like lots of Flash guys I have a big wasted blob of brain marked... LINGO.

0

Pascal - my "technology requirement" in high school was Pascal, Cobol, or (strangely) Cooking. It was a kind of sweet torture - staring at a monochrome screen in a dimly lit room stepping through code with the wafting smell of cookies and the sound of laughter coming from the other room. Then again, I'm sure none of the cooking kids are chefs now, whereas...

0

If you want one of the more unusual languages, try the assembly langauge used by the microprocessor was used in the HP 41C calculator! This was a state of the art programmable calculator released in 1979. It had it's own reversh polish (RPN) programming language. However, under the hood was a microprocessor that could be accessed with special hardware attached.

Hackers eventually discovered how to dump the internal ROMs of the calculator and decode its instruction set. It used 56 bit registers and most of the instructions were 10 bites in length. And get this, the return stack only had 4 levels!

Eventually HP released thr source code to the calculator (called the NOMAS listings - NOt MAnufacturer Supported) and this enabled a flood of software to be written.

Those were the days!

0

Assembler for the Motorola 6800.

BASIC... but really, who doesn't know BASIC.

0

Off the top of my head, how about:

  • SNOBOL
  • Simula
  • Burroughs D-machine (for nano-programming of chip instructions for microprocessors)
  • PDP11 Assembler (JSR PC,GETSTUFFT)
  • MIDITRAN (subset of FORTRAN)
  • APL

All of these were taught as a part of the Computer Science course at UNSW in the late '70's. This was when the famous Lions book, and course, were in full swing! Interesting times and I've still got my original copies of both the listing book and the commentary book.

cheers,

Rob

0

I used a gwbasic like language to teach my self to program about 8 years ago on a braille lite 18. This is an ancient palm pilot type device design for use by blind people that is no longer manufactured and has no emulators for it.

0

Atari ST Basic. Great computer, horrible Basic.

0
  • 6202 Assembly
  • C64 BASIC
  • Amiga BASIC
  • AREXX (like apple script but the Amiga answer to it)
  • I learned Forth and Logo in high school.

Not that I really "know" any of these anymore. The knowledge has long since been committed to cobweb memory.

0

I used to code PL/1 on an IBM 3081 mainframe. Before that I knew BASIC (8 bit micros) and FORTRAN77, and thought PL/1 was a huge step forward. Alternatives on offer were Pascal, Algol and BCPL. I really liked PL/1s in-your-face "BEGIN;" & "END;"s (yup, instead of "{" & "}"); that and the nifty fixed-point integer types and built-in support for parallelism.

0

My introduction to assembler was on the Z80 for the TRS-80 Model II. It was an incredibly enjoyable experience, but while there seem to be emulators for the Model I and III/IV, nobody has taken up the chore of implementing one for the II and it's lovely 8" disks, despite there being a lot of technical information available. (Yes, I've considered giving it a shot, but it's way down on a long list of stuff I need to work on head of it. :P)

0

I had to learn Ada95 in my first semester of post-secondary education. The reason for that language was because it was strongly-typed. There are other strongly-typed languages, but I think the BASIC-like syntax was also a deciding factor. I still haven't seen a language since that came with a built-in data type for wraparound arrays.

0

Does wiring a collator board count as a programming language? These were called plugboard programs. I used to wire the boards on an IBM 88 Collator many years ago....

0

PPE was actually quite fun - quite a powerful scripting language for PCBoard BBS systems.

0

R.I.P.

  • Turbo Pascal
  • AMOS
  • Amiga E
0

QBASIC would be the most prominent.

I'm intimately familiar with COG, an event-based, C-like scripting language used in LucasArts' Jedi Knight. Although a mess of a language (you could use keywords as symbols), it compiled into bytecode and ran in a VM. It wasn't interpreted like most games' scripting languages were. As a result, it was ridiculously fast by comparison.

0

Completely dead languages:

NCR's 315 NEAT

Alpha Micro Basic

Data General MVS Assembler

BOS Micro-COBOL (except for a possible use in France under a different name)

Wang VS COBOL

Cadol 3

A Language thought to be dead but actually alive and well.

dBASE -> www.dbase.com (now fully OOD and OOP).

0

I got the feeling I will never ever be called upon to write any more Bliss.

0

OPL - it was a programming language for the Psion Series 3 organiser. I think the Psion 5 used it too, but that is also no longer being manufactured.

Edit: Redacted! It looks like OPL is alive in the form of an open source project, however Symbian aren't providing much support for it, so it'll probably die at some point.

0

Visual FoxPro

0

The one I miss the most is Digital Research's CB-80 (CBASIC). I wrote a lot of stuff in that language during the early 1980s on an Altos 8000-10 under the MP/M II operating system. That was back when having a 10 megabyte hard disk and 32K RAM was pretty good.

0

8085 assembly language :) though i must say i loved it somehow ;)

0

Basic for the Atari 2600 VCS.

0

DBase III Plus

0

Algol-68 on a machine with 16K RAM.

0

I was surprised to find that APL and PL/I are available today. There are a few others that could be put to rest without adversely affecting civilization as we know it, such as Cobol and RPG.

For dead languages I'll have to settle for a limited knowledge of Algol 68 and a few assembly languages, such as Z-80 and 6502. There are various implementations of Basic that are history, but I wouldn't consider the Basic language dead. Fortran 66 is essentially gone, but I imagine a few compilers today have ANSI 66 compatibility modes.

0

Modula-2 - I used this for my PhD research, and managed to do some rather evil things to implement dynamically loaded modules.

CLU - the original MIT version: this was an object-based language with a GC.

Cambridge CLU - had language-level support for RPCs.

Mesa - the programming language of the Xerox D-machines when they weren't running Smalltalk or Lisp. (Who remembers the joys of "world swap" debugging?)

BCPL - a strongly typed language with only one type ... according to its designer.

Algol-S - the grand-daddy of orthogonal persistent languages

Napier-88 - another orthogonal persistent language

Refine - an interesting language that allowed to embed other languages. More a platform than just a language. IIRC, it cost $US25,000 per seat in ~1990. (No surprise that it never took off!)

0
  • LISP (Lots of Irritating Single Parenthesis)
  • MIPS Assembly
0

I still know SH4 assembler which was used on the DreamCast, which incidently is 10 years old/dead - cries. Best console EVER :(

0

Computer Associates' OpenROAD (if it ain't dead, it sure should be)

0

Cypress Enable Basic

Used it as a scripting language in a document management application

0

When will C# become a dead language?

0

PL/1. I remember late nights carrying a deck of punch card to the hopper.

0
  1. OjectPAL (Paradox for Applications, which seemed to have extremely little to do with object-orientation)

  2. Informix 4GL (early-90s)

0

BBC Basic, GWBasic and whichever strangely cooked-up dialect of Pascal the old Pyramid RISC machines used to run.

0

BASIC09
Pascal09

I did a checkup/list recently, and probably some of the OTHER 35 languages are dead...

0

Do zombie languages count? If so, then I know VBScript and pre-.Net VB.

0

COBOL

But it's not really dead it's the unholy Undead language.

0

I was going to say HP's IMAGE database language but it seems it's still around now as ALLBASE/SQL.

0

Seagate HOLOS

Was a 4GL language used for OLAP systems. Is still in use at some companies I did consulting for ten years ago but it is no longer sold...

It was a very good abstraction over typical OLAP problems, like stacking and racking datacubes, scarce data, consolidation along hierarchical dimensions and so on...

A few old colleagues and I once got together and agreed that it would be worth, relaunching the product. The problem is: HOLOS itself is written in APCL, "Anthony Proctor C Language" that is... I met Anthony once and asked him to implement a few new language features. He was already a very senior developer back then, so I am not sure, if he would be interested to teach us up...

0

PRO-IV programming in early 90's

0

Old programming languages never die, they just get swapped out.

SPL - HP's Systems Programming Language.

Unnamed machine language for the EDP-18 computer. Programmed by using the front panel of the computer to punch in programs, and later by using paper tape to read programs in via a teletype.

PL/C - a PL/I variant that tried to correct errors as it encountered them. Kind of interesting in that no matter how badly you screwed up your program would run, although it would probably not produce the output you intended. I would have expected PL/I to be dead as well, but according to IBM's site it's still supported.

The brain-dead "fourth generation" HR package I worked on at BP 20 years ago. I never knew until then how much a "fourth generation tool" would look like assembler. Don't remember the name - I think the brain cells concerned with that tool commited ritual suicide some years ago for the greater good of the whole. :-)

Turbo Pascal (which I thought was seriously cool back in the mid-80's) evolved into Delphi, which I wish was dead every time I have to use it.

I thought Dbase might be dead but, lo, it lives! www.dbase.com

And there's probably some specific language implementations that are long dead along with their hardware (e.g. Wang 3300 BASIC), but there are enough BASIC implementations around that I don't think we can call it 'dead'.

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DCL - Digital Command Language, which is scripting language used on VMS, which is also mostly dead.

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How about B Language which is the predecessor of C

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QUEL, the original query language for the first Ingres version.

http://www.bizyx.com/ingres/section10.htm

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Interlisp Lisp Machine Lisp Turbo Pascal Think C

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My first program was written in Mercury autocode in 1963, and later ran on the KDF9 - see http://www.chemeng.ed.ac.uk/people/jack/history/autocodes/ These were real languages, compiled and run - input was by paper tape. I'd doubt there are any emulators though I'd be pleased to be proved wrong.

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I know a deadly programming language.

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Delphi

Pascal

Turbo Basic