11

I'm thinking about making the career switch to being a full time web developer, so I'm obviously in doubt about whether or not this is the right choice. I have no formal training in it, but I've already done some professional work so I know I could at least start. I also seem to really enjoy web work, at least on a hobby level. I'm just wondering who out there really regrets being in this line of work, and why? Or are you all completely happy doing what you do?

7

I never regretted being a Developer until I met a software architect who was never a developer.

5

By the eighth remix of very simple CRUD applications you might get bored. I did.

Validate some user input, add a new record, display the record in a grid, click to go to a details view, bleh.

4

When I have to interact with my former manager who:

  • has two fine arts associates degrees,
  • has failed to get his bachelors degree that the company paid for him to get,
  • has been promoted, which is why he is my former manager,
  • has no idea what a .xsd file is, or anything real technical knowledge,

Yes. There's a reason everyone loves Dilbert.

That being said,

  • When I get to solve someone's problem,
  • When I create something of my own,
  • When I learn something new,
  • When I contribute something on SO,

Absolutely not. I love being a developer.

3

Your job is much like the rest of your life: you get as much out of it as you put into it.

The rot really sets in when you inexplicably starting believing that it's up to your job or your employer to motivate you and not the other way around. When that happens you need to change your attitude. your situation and/or your job.

Bored with your job? Find a better one. Do something else?

But to answer your question: do I regret it? I've certainly gone through phases where I have been sick of it. But regret it? Overall? No.

I started programming when I was about 10. I never ven really considered doing anything else. Nor can I imagine what else I might do now that isn't software development or related to that somehow (starting a business, etc).

2

If you're looking to form your own company, may I suggest making contact with other small developers in the area. I was a member of a small group of entrepreneurs who owned web design/programming firms, and they had invaluable advice how to deal with the issues that come up when starting your own web developer company. I used meetup.com to find the networking group I got my information from, but try to find other networking events in the area too.

1

My answer is "I am Happy"...at least until now... Because I am still new to the industry and work experience is still around 1 year.. And if I am getting some interesting things to do, then I am self-satisfied So I dont regret :)

But Beware!!! - This Thread may be closed soon... :D NPR ;)

When I was in university sometimes I had a feeling like... "Coding infront of a Computer.. A whole day..... OOOps... How can I do that?" But now I don't feel such a thing, because I am learning and learning some interesting things..

Adding something according to the other answers.. If you are getting conventional and Boring things again and again, I think it might lead to a person to regret. Comments are welcome..

And if you think about another profession, the status might be same...

Profession ~= Doing the same thing Daily ;)

1

It was between being a Science Fiction writer, struggling on for years and getting paid peanuts for books/stories and having a job that basically involved the same talents (good typing speed and the ability to connect with people who aren't from this world [programmers are strange, ask my wife]).

So I am a programmer now. I hack away at a keyboard sitting in a corner for hours on. very much like a writer. What's the difference you ask? The cover of the product I make doesn't carry my name. :)

0

Completly happiness is utopic, but getting paid for doing some lines of "only you know what" it's almost the the same. The problem arises when neither you know what these lines were for! :)

0

"Web Developer" is as wide and varied as working for anyone from your local car hire firm, displaying rates in a grid, to the next facebook/twitter, to hammering out requirements for the site for a record label.

I don't dislike my career, but i've downright loathed some of the people I've worked for.

0

For a while, I was bored and regretted my choice - same programs with minor variations for months on end.

Then I started learning as much as I could in my spare time, became more motivated, and work got fun again.

Now I feel excited about the future of my career, something I'd have thought impossible a couple of years back.

I no longer regret my choice.

0

Well, as someone who originally chose a development career, and then decided to take a short (going on 4.5 years now :( ) side trip - I am now a security consultant - I can tell you this: I regret every day NOT being a developer, I miss it terribly. Though what @jfar said about getting boring after remixing the same code over and over again CAN be true - it doesn't have to be. I got to that at some point in my first programming job, so I moved to another, more challenging and VERY different type of programming job... That's another cool thing about it, there is SUCH variety in programming. One thing that does hold the same (for almost all programming jobs), and is one of the main things for me - but it really depends on your own personality - you get to build stuff from nothing. Pure thought experiments, translated to productive reality. But as I said, it depends on your own personality, and what you enjoy doing...

0

I don't regret being a developer at all-- I love it.

The parts I don't like about it all seem to stem from interaction with non-developers. Namely management. As cited in the above posts, Dilbert, and true to the stereotype, there seems to be a prevalent disconnect between management and the coders. I left two projects directly because of my distaste for either my manager or the PM.

It's my dream to branch out to start my own business. One of the easiest ways to conceive of doing this would be to go into web consulting for small-mid sized businesses. Given the nature of those types of sites, the customer would care primarily about their UI theme, custom graphics, and site navigation. So since a lot of this visible work falls in-line with a web-development type of role instead of a software engineer-type of role, I am personally considering much the same career choice as you have described.

I think a good point to keep in mind is that if you do go for the switch, your primary duties may encompass more configuration and UI work, but this doesn't preclude that you must stop development altogether.

0

It's a great career for people with inquisitve, creative and technical minds. But in order to stay sane be sure to cultivate a few non-computer related hobbies, and you'll be happy. Otherwise you may be happy with your job, but I can't vouche you'll have a fun life.

0

I started by programming z80 assembly language when i was 12 years old. I got into Maths at University, but apart from that I have always been a programmer. Now I manage developers, so I miss out on doing developing, and I am stuck with some very boring stuff.

I never regretted being a developer one bit! Could not imagine a more rewarding career for me. Depends on you, really.

-1

Well it was between this and a career in porn , so far I have no regrets.