11

So, we've all seen ASCII tables and anyone can search for one. What what's the nicest one, the cleanest, most legible, most useful ASCII table you've come across.


(i.e.) Probably not the very first one on the Google search.

18

alt text

I actually keep my old A Book On C book around just for its ASCII table near the back.

11

Protip:

for(unsigned char i = 0; i < 256; i++)
{
  printf("%i : %c \n", i, i);
}
6

I guess you're not on a Unix system? "man ascii" has always given me one.

(Yes, since 1983 at least.)

6

http://ascii-table.com/ gets my vote as perhaps the nicest site. It's subtle, laid back, and they tell you that DLE stands for "Data Link Escape."

And then they throw in the entire Unicode charset as well, with a search engine for it.

Too bad the paper-tape encoder didn't work for me. But then again, I've still got a BSD machine around, which unlike Linux, includes useful utilities:

$ /usr/games/ppt Hello, world.
___________
| o  o.   |
| oo  .o o|
| oo o.o  |
| oo o.o  |
| oo o.ooo|
|  o o.o  |
|  o  .   |
| ooo .ooo|
| oo o.ooo|
| ooo . o |
| oo o.o  |
| oo  .o  |
|  o o.oo |
___________
$
5

http://www.asciitable.com

3

ascii table in tex and pdf - 'njoy !

2

Although ASCII tables are useful for C programmers, Unicode is probably more useful for the rest of the world. The code charts are in PDF, so not pastable here (copyright issues aside).

Jump page for text code charts

Unicode chart for ASCII (Basic Latin)

Unicode chart for ISO-88591-1 codepoints from 128 to 255 (Latin 1)